Rembrandt van Rijn
Saint Bartholomew, c. 1633, oil on panel, Charlotte E. W. Buffington Fund, Worcester Art Museum, USA.
The David O. Russell film American Hustle was filmed in part at the Worcester Art Museum in April of 2013, featuring this very painting above. In the film the character played by Christian Bale stands in front of Saint Bartholomew painting and says the following to Bradley Cooper‘s character: “It’s a fake! People believe what they wanna believe. The guy who made this was so good that it’s real to everybody…”
So you were probably wondering, is the Worcester Art Museum’s Rembrandt really a fake? The reply comes from a museum’s spokesperson:
“There are no questions about the authenticity of the painting, — he told the press. — It was almost certainly produced in his [Rembrandt’s] studio.”

Rembrandt van Rijn

Saint Bartholomew, c. 1633, oil on panel, Charlotte E. W. Buffington Fund, Worcester Art Museum, USA.

The David O. Russell film American Hustle was filmed in part at the Worcester Art Museum in April of 2013, featuring this very painting above. In the film the character played by Christian Bale stands in front of Saint Bartholomew painting and says the following to Bradley Cooper‘s character: “It’s a fake! People believe what they wanna believe. The guy who made this was so good that it’s real to everybody…”

So you were probably wondering, is the Worcester Art Museum’s Rembrandt really a fake? The reply comes from a museum’s spokesperson:

There are no questions about the authenticity of the painting he told the press. — It was almost certainly produced in his [Rembrandt’s] studio.”

57 notes

Happy birthday, Vincent van Gogh! The genius was born on this day in 1853. Here are a few interesting facts about his life you might already know or could be interested to find out:
1. Van Gogh did not begin painting until his late twenties, completing many of his best-known works during the last two years of his life.
2. Vincent’s earliest career aspiration was to be a pastor in the Dutch Reformed Church like his father.
3. There is some evidence that Van Gogh nibbled at his paints, and the eating of paints is possibly connected with his seizure around New Year 1890. In January 1890, after another one of Vincent’s seizures, Theo wrote to him saying "if you know that it is dangerous for you to have colours near you, why don’t you clear them away for a time, and make drawings?"
4. Van Gogh signed his paintings simply "Vincent", not “Vincent van Gogh” nor “Van Gogh”. In a letter to his brother Theo, written on 24 March 1888, he said that “in the future my name ought to be put in the catalogue as I sign it on the canvas, namely Vincent and not Van Gogh, for the simple reason that they do not know how to pronounce the latter name here.” (“Here” being Arles, in the south of France)If you’ve wondered how you pronounce Van Gogh, remember it’s a Dutch surname, not French or English. So the “Gogh” is pronounced so it rhymes with the the Scottish “loch”. It’s not “goff” nor “go”. 
5. When van Gogh died, his work was known to only a handful of people and appreciated by fewer still. He only sold one painting during his lifetime.
6. Vincent is believed to have shot himself in a wheatfield in Auvers, France, although no gun was ever found. He did not die until 2 days later at the age of 37. 
7. Vincent’s brother Theo died six months after Vincent and is buried next to him in Auvers, France.
8. Theor’s wife collected Vincent’s paintings and letters after his death and dedicated herself to getting his work the recognition it deserved.
Painting:Vincent van GoghFishing in Spring, the Pont de Clichy, 1887, oil on canvas, 50.5 × 60 cm, Art Institute of Chicago. 

Happy birthday, Vincent van Gogh! The genius was born on this day in 1853. Here are a few interesting facts about his life you might already know or could be interested to find out:

1. Van Gogh did not begin painting until his late twenties, completing many of his best-known works during the last two years of his life.

2. Vincent’s earliest career aspiration was to be a pastor in the Dutch Reformed Church like his father.

3. There is some evidence that Van Gogh nibbled at his paints, and the eating of paints is possibly connected with his seizure around New Year 1890. In January 1890, after another one of Vincent’s seizures, Theo wrote to him saying "if you know that it is dangerous for you to have colours near you, why don’t you clear them away for a time, and make drawings?"

4. Van Gogh signed his paintings simply "Vincent", not “Vincent van Gogh” nor “Van Gogh”. In a letter to his brother Theo, written on 24 March 1888, he said that “in the future my name ought to be put in the catalogue as I sign it on the canvas, namely Vincent and not Van Gogh, for the simple reason that they do not know how to pronounce the latter name here.” (“Here” being Arles, in the south of France)
If you’ve wondered how you pronounce Van Gogh, remember it’s a Dutch surname, not French or English. So the “Gogh” is pronounced so it rhymes with the the Scottish “loch”. It’s not “goff” nor “go”. 

5. When van Gogh died, his work was known to only a handful of people and appreciated by fewer still. He only sold one painting during his lifetime.

6. Vincent is believed to have shot himself in a wheatfield in Auvers, France, although no gun was ever found. He did not die until 2 days later at the age of 37. 

7. Vincent’s brother Theo died six months after Vincent and is buried next to him in Auvers, France.

8. Theor’s wife collected Vincent’s paintings and letters after his death and dedicated herself to getting his work the recognition it deserved.

Painting:
Vincent van Gogh
Fishing in Spring, the Pont de Clichy, 1887, oil on canvas, 50.5 × 60 cm, Art Institute of Chicago. 

1,727 notes

Whoever already watched The Grand Budapest Hotel is probably wondering, whether the two central paintings in the film are real artworks. Whoever hasn’t watched the film yet, go watch it first and then come back to this post! The film is great!!

The “priceless” painting Boy with Apple in Wes Anderson’s film is actually a 21st-century, made-for-film creation. It was painted by artist Michael Taylor – so it’s a fiction within a fiction that plays delicately with the art history of old Europe, pretending it is a real Renaissance masterpiece.
The artist Johannes Van Hoytl the Younger, to whom this renowned and unimaginably expensive masterpiece is attributed in the film, has much in common with other masters of the Renaissance in northern Europe. In one of the interviews Wes Anderson said, that the reference was intentionally made to kind of Flemish painters. They were trying to suggest that it wasn’t an Italian Renaissance painting, but a more northern one.

When a film’s character realises the painting is missing, he notices a watercolour of lesbian lovers hanging on the wall instead of it, that instantly brings the Austrian genius Egon Schiele in mind. However, Two Lesbians Masturbating was painted by Rich Pellegrinocommissioned to create this Schiele-type erotic painting by Wes Anderson. 

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir
The Bay of Naples, 1881, oil on canvas, 59.7 x 81.3 cm, the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

The Bay of Naples, 1881, oil on canvas, 59.7 x 81.3 cm, the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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The way we document the surroundings change together with the face of the cities we live in. Halley Docherty has taken 18th and 19th-century well known historical paintings of city scenes around the world and superimposed them on to present-day Google Street View screenshots. Take a look at more collages of cities then and now! 

Photo credits (do not remove if you reblog!) : Halley Docherty.

Via The Guardian

302 notes

Vincent van Gogh
Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear and Pipe, 1889, oil on canvas, Tate Gallery, London, United Kingdom.
Vincent van Gogh created many self-portraits during his lifetime. In most cases Van Gogh’s self-portraits are depicting the face as it appeared in the mirror he used to reproduce his face, i.e. his right side in the image is in reality the left side of his face.
This portrait brilliantly illustrates it. It was painted in January of 1889 just weeks after part of Van Gogh’s ear was cut off. His right ear is bandaged in the portrait though in reality the wound was to his left ear.
The precise chain of events that led to the celebrated incident of van Gogh slicing off his ear is not known reliably in detail. It is said he cut off his own earlobe following a violent argument with fellow painter Paul Gauguin. The only account attesting a supposed razor attack on Gauguin comes from Gauguin himself some fifteen years later, and biographers agree this account must be considered unreliable and self-serving. It does seem likely, however, that by 23 December 1888 van Gogh had realised that Gauguin was proposing to leave and that there had been some kind of dispute between the two. That evening van Gogh severed his left ear (wholly or in part, accounts differ) with a razor, causing a severe haemorrhage. He bandaged his wound and then wrapped the ear in paper and delivered the package to a brothel frequented by both him and Gauguin before returning home and collapsing. He was found unconscious the next day by the police and taken to hospital. The local newspaper reported that van Gogh had given the ear to a prostitute with an instruction to guard it carefully.

Vincent van Gogh

Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear and Pipe, 1889, oil on canvas, Tate Gallery, London, United Kingdom.

Vincent van Gogh created many self-portraits during his lifetime. In most cases Van Gogh’s self-portraits are depicting the face as it appeared in the mirror he used to reproduce his face, i.e. his right side in the image is in reality the left side of his face.

This portrait brilliantly illustrates it. It was painted in January of 1889 just weeks after part of Van Gogh’s ear was cut off. His right ear is bandaged in the portrait though in reality the wound was to his left ear.

The precise chain of events that led to the celebrated incident of van Gogh slicing off his ear is not known reliably in detail. It is said he cut off his own earlobe following a violent argument with fellow painter Paul Gauguin. The only account attesting a supposed razor attack on Gauguin comes from Gauguin himself some fifteen years later, and biographers agree this account must be considered unreliable and self-serving. It does seem likely, however, that by 23 December 1888 van Gogh had realised that Gauguin was proposing to leave and that there had been some kind of dispute between the two. That evening van Gogh severed his left ear (wholly or in part, accounts differ) with a razor, causing a severe haemorrhage. He bandaged his wound and then wrapped the ear in paper and delivered the package to a brothel frequented by both him and Gauguin before returning home and collapsing. He was found unconscious the next day by the police and taken to hospital. The local newspaper reported that van Gogh had given the ear to a prostitute with an instruction to guard it carefully.

111 notes

Gustav Klimt 
Face of a Girl, c. 1898, oil on cardboard, 38 x 34 cm, private collection.

Gustav Klimt

Face of a Girl, c. 1898, oil on cardboard, 38 x 34 cm, private collection.

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Serge Feeleenger is an artist from Belarus, currently living in its capital, Minsk. His interests include not only paintings and drawing, but also music and prose. Serge is a self-taught artist. He started learning from the old masters, but never abandoned a deep passion for new experiments. He tried himself in all possible panting genres and styles, from expressionism to the hyper-realism, and slowly but steadily his own style became recognisable. His strong interest in experiments helped him to create a special way of glass painting as well as "ten brushes technique" - literally using all ten fingers to create canvases. He started the experiment by using just three fingers, then developed the idea and thus discovered a revolutionary painting technique that could simultaneously be a painting style.
Painting featured:Ballet (the first canvas of the triptych “Ballet”), 2012, oil on canvas, ten brushes technique, 50 x 70 cm.

Serge Feeleenger is an artist from Belarus, currently living in its capital, Minsk. His interests include not only paintings and drawing, but also music and prose. 
Serge is a self-taught artist. He started learning from the old masters, but never abandoned a deep passion for new experiments. He tried himself in all possible panting genres and styles, from expressionism to the hyper-realism, and slowly but steadily his own style became recognisable. His strong interest in experiments helped him to create a special way of glass painting as well as "ten brushes technique" - literally using all ten fingers to create canvases. He started the experiment by using just three fingers, then developed the idea and thus discovered a revolutionary painting technique that could simultaneously be a painting style.

Painting featured:
Ballet (the first canvas of the triptych “Ballet”), 2012, oil on canvas, ten brushes technique, 50 x 70 cm.

141 notes

Giorgio Kienerk (Italian, 1869 – 1948)
L’enigma umano, triptych, 1900, private collection.
Left to right: Il Piacere (The Pleasure), oil on canvas, 188 x 63,8 cm. Il Silenzio (The Silence), oil on canvas, 170.5 x 94 cm.Il Dolore (The Grief), oil on canvas, 188.5 x 62.3 cm.

Giorgio Kienerk (Italian, 1869 – 1948)

L’enigma umano, triptych, 1900, private collection.

Left to right: 
Il Piacere (The Pleasure), oil on canvas, 188 x 63,8 cm. 
Il Silenzio (The Silence)oil on canvas, 170.5 x 94 cm.
Il Dolore (The Grief), oil on canvas, 188.5 x 62.3 cm.

178 notes

Maurice Utrillo
Sacre-Coeur de Montmartre, 1937, gouache on paper mounted on canvas, 27 x 21 inches, Indianapolis Museum of Art.
Maurice Utrillo is best known for his views of Paris. This painting offers a glimpse of the famous church of Sacre-Coeur (Sacred Heart), identified by the immense white dome at the end of the narrow street. The church is the most familiar building of Montmartre, the artistic quarter on the north side of Paris that Utrillo frequented.Utrillo suffered from alcoholism and mental disorders and was encouraged to paint by his mother, the artist Suzanne Valadon, who was his only teacher.

Maurice Utrillo

Sacre-Coeur de Montmartre, 1937, gouache on paper mounted on canvas, 27 x 21 inches, Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Maurice Utrillo is best known for his views of Paris. This painting offers a glimpse of the famous church of Sacre-Coeur (Sacred Heart), identified by the immense white dome at the end of the narrow street. The church is the most familiar building of Montmartre, the artistic quarter on the north side of Paris that Utrillo frequented.
Utrillo suffered from alcoholism and mental disorders and was encouraged to paint by his mother, the artist Suzanne Valadon, who was his only teacher.

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