Kees van Dongen
Portrait de Madame Maria Ricotti, 1921, oil on canvas, City of Paris’ Museum of Modern Art. 

Kees van Dongen

Portrait de Madame Maria Ricotti, 1921, oil on canvas, City of Paris’ Museum of Modern Art. 

184 notes

Italian illustrator Federico Babina has created a series of posters called ARTISTECT, splicing 25 world-renowned paintings from artists like Picasso, Miró and Kandinsky with buildings by the 20th century’s most prolific architects. What a dialogue amongst the most celebrated forms of art and architecture!

In this exercise of overlapping styles, it is perhaps easier at first glance to identify the artist. But careful inspection of the drawings reveals the idiosyncratic and stylistic tendencies of some of our most beloved architects.

I attempted to locate each feasible and impossible encounters in between artists and architects,” Babina told Dezeen, architecture and design magazine.

Read and see more on Dezeen.

72 notes

A breathtaking dive into the blue

Gustavo Silva Nuñez is an artist based in Valencia, Venezuela. He creates incredibly lifelike paintings of people swimming in water that appear three-dimensional due to a particular use of light and reflections. 

With a stroke of the brush Gustavo manages to capture every little detail, all shades of blue, sparkling flashes of light, the distortion of bodies under water, myriads of waves.

To add to the realism, he poses next to the paintings in strikingly interactive ways, making it look as though he is shielding himself from the splashes or is about to to dive into the water.

61 notes

Van Gogh’s biography as a graphic novel

Vincent van Gogh is arguably one of the world’s most popular artists and a man who led a turbulent, tragic life in pursuit of his dreams. 

A brief but tumultuous time in his life, the year or so the artist spent in Arles, south of France, is the focus for the graphic biographical novel by the Dutch writer and illustrator Barbara Stok. Her vibrant clear storytelling evokes the energy, colour and passion of Van Gogh’s work, reinterpreting some of his most acclaimed paintings.  

Barbara Stok’s drawing style has a unique quality – it is simple, almost childlike – and this very simplicity gives her the ability to distil a scene down into its root nature with an elegant clarity. 

An affectionate tribute to the “tortured artist” is merely a brief snapshot into his troubled life, but it’s more than enough to give us a clearer understanding of the drive behind some of the most admired works of all times. Behind every work of art there is a human being trying to make sense of the world and find their place in it.

"Vincent" was officially commissioned by the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

Source

373 notes

Albert Henry Collings (1868-1947)
The Fortune Teller, pastel on paper, 53.50 x 43 cm, private collection.

Albert Henry Collings (1868-1947)

The Fortune Teller, pastel on paper, 53.50 x 43 cm, private collection.

78 notes

A hidden painting has been found by scientists beneath the brush strokes of The Blue Room, a 1901 Pablo Picasso artwork. He created both works in Paris during his famous blue period.

Art experts and conservators at The Phillips Collection in Washington used infrared on the masterpiece, revealing a bow-tied man with his face resting on his hand.

The Blue Room has been the subject of exploration since 2008 by experts from the Phillips Collection, National Gallery of Art, Cornell University and Delaware’s Winterthur Museum. Improved infrared technology allowed them to see a man wearing a jacket and bow tie, resting his bearded face on his hand with three rings on his fingers.

Technical analysis confirmed the hidden portrait was likely to have been painted just before The Blue Room. The experts are still still trying to figure out, who the man was. 

Source BBC

Read about a similar discovery here.

488 notes

Kees van Dongen

Egyptian Girl with a Pearl Necklace (with detail), 1912-1913, oil on canvas, 100 x 81 cm, private collection.

125 notes

Henri-Edmond Cross 
La Plage de Saint-Clair, 1896, oil on canvas, 54.5 x 65.4 cm, private collection.
Read more on pointillism here.

Henri-Edmond Cross

La Plage de Saint-Clair, 1896, oil on canvas, 54.5 x 65.4 cm, private collection.

Read more on pointillism here.

205 notes

Claude Monet’s iconic 1907 painting ”Nymphéas” (“Water Lilies”), painted in his beloved garden Giverny, France, has been sold for $24 million to an undisclosed Asian buyer in the season-opening auction of impressionist and modern art at Christie’s. 
The work is part of heiress Huguette Clark’s estate and has been off the market since 1930. Now Christie’s is selling hundreds of items from Clark’s collection after a feud over her estate was settled in the fall. The Montana copper mining heiress died at 104 in 2011. Her father, U.S. Sen. William A. Clark, founded Las Vegas.

Claude Monet’s iconic 1907 painting Nymphéas” (“Water Lilies”), painted in his beloved garden Giverny, France, has been sold for $24 million to an undisclosed Asian buyer in the season-opening auction of impressionist and modern art at Christie’s. 

The work is part of heiress Huguette Clark’s estate and has been off the market since 1930. Now Christie’s is selling hundreds of items from Clark’s collection after a feud over her estate was settled in the fall. The Montana copper mining heiress died at 104 in 2011. Her father, U.S. Sen. William A. Clark, founded Las Vegas.

685 notes

I try to apply colors like words that shape poems, like notes that shape music.

Joan Miro

177 notes

Page 1 of 103

1

2

3

4

5

Next ›