A hidden painting has been found by scientists beneath the brush strokes of The Blue Room, a 1901 Pablo Picasso artwork. He created both works in Paris during his famous blue period.

Art experts and conservators at The Phillips Collection in Washington used infrared on the masterpiece, revealing a bow-tied man with his face resting on his hand.

The Blue Room has been the subject of exploration since 2008 by experts from the Phillips Collection, National Gallery of Art, Cornell University and Delaware’s Winterthur Museum. Improved infrared technology allowed them to see a man wearing a jacket and bow tie, resting his bearded face on his hand with three rings on his fingers.

Technical analysis confirmed the hidden portrait was likely to have been painted just before The Blue Room. The experts are still still trying to figure out, who the man was. 

Source BBC

Read about a similar discovery here.

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Kees van Dongen

Egyptian Girl with a Pearl Necklace (with detail), 1912-1913, oil on canvas, 100 x 81 cm, private collection.

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Henri-Edmond Cross 
La Plage de Saint-Clair, 1896, oil on canvas, 54.5 x 65.4 cm, private collection.
Read more on pointillism here.

Henri-Edmond Cross

La Plage de Saint-Clair, 1896, oil on canvas, 54.5 x 65.4 cm, private collection.

Read more on pointillism here.

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Claude Monet’s iconic 1907 painting ”Nymphéas” (“Water Lilies”), painted in his beloved garden Giverny, France, has been sold for $24 million to an undisclosed Asian buyer in the season-opening auction of impressionist and modern art at Christie’s. 
The work is part of heiress Huguette Clark’s estate and has been off the market since 1930. Now Christie’s is selling hundreds of items from Clark’s collection after a feud over her estate was settled in the fall. The Montana copper mining heiress died at 104 in 2011. Her father, U.S. Sen. William A. Clark, founded Las Vegas.

Claude Monet’s iconic 1907 painting Nymphéas” (“Water Lilies”), painted in his beloved garden Giverny, France, has been sold for $24 million to an undisclosed Asian buyer in the season-opening auction of impressionist and modern art at Christie’s. 

The work is part of heiress Huguette Clark’s estate and has been off the market since 1930. Now Christie’s is selling hundreds of items from Clark’s collection after a feud over her estate was settled in the fall. The Montana copper mining heiress died at 104 in 2011. Her father, U.S. Sen. William A. Clark, founded Las Vegas.

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I try to apply colors like words that shape poems, like notes that shape music.

Joan Miro

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Rembrandt van Rijn
Saint Bartholomew, c. 1633, oil on panel, Charlotte E. W. Buffington Fund, Worcester Art Museum, USA.
The David O. Russell film American Hustle was filmed in part at the Worcester Art Museum in April of 2013, featuring this very painting above. In the film the character played by Christian Bale stands in front of Saint Bartholomew painting and says the following to Bradley Cooper‘s character: “It’s a fake! People believe what they wanna believe. The guy who made this was so good that it’s real to everybody…”
So you were probably wondering, is the Worcester Art Museum’s Rembrandt really a fake? The reply comes from a museum’s spokesperson:
“There are no questions about the authenticity of the painting, — he told the press. — It was almost certainly produced in his [Rembrandt’s] studio.”

Rembrandt van Rijn

Saint Bartholomew, c. 1633, oil on panel, Charlotte E. W. Buffington Fund, Worcester Art Museum, USA.

The David O. Russell film American Hustle was filmed in part at the Worcester Art Museum in April of 2013, featuring this very painting above. In the film the character played by Christian Bale stands in front of Saint Bartholomew painting and says the following to Bradley Cooper‘s character: “It’s a fake! People believe what they wanna believe. The guy who made this was so good that it’s real to everybody…”

So you were probably wondering, is the Worcester Art Museum’s Rembrandt really a fake? The reply comes from a museum’s spokesperson:

There are no questions about the authenticity of the painting he told the press. — It was almost certainly produced in his [Rembrandt’s] studio.”

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Happy birthday, Vincent van Gogh! The genius was born on this day in 1853. Here are a few interesting facts about his life you might already know or could be interested to find out:
1. Van Gogh did not begin painting until his late twenties, completing many of his best-known works during the last two years of his life.
2. Vincent’s earliest career aspiration was to be a pastor in the Dutch Reformed Church like his father.
3. There is some evidence that Van Gogh nibbled at his paints, and the eating of paints is possibly connected with his seizure around New Year 1890. In January 1890, after another one of Vincent’s seizures, Theo wrote to him saying "if you know that it is dangerous for you to have colours near you, why don’t you clear them away for a time, and make drawings?"
4. Van Gogh signed his paintings simply "Vincent", not “Vincent van Gogh” nor “Van Gogh”. In a letter to his brother Theo, written on 24 March 1888, he said that “in the future my name ought to be put in the catalogue as I sign it on the canvas, namely Vincent and not Van Gogh, for the simple reason that they do not know how to pronounce the latter name here.” (“Here” being Arles, in the south of France)If you’ve wondered how you pronounce Van Gogh, remember it’s a Dutch surname, not French or English. So the “Gogh” is pronounced so it rhymes with the the Scottish “loch”. It’s not “goff” nor “go”. 
5. When van Gogh died, his work was known to only a handful of people and appreciated by fewer still. He only sold one painting during his lifetime.
6. Vincent is believed to have shot himself in a wheatfield in Auvers, France, although no gun was ever found. He did not die until 2 days later at the age of 37. 
7. Vincent’s brother Theo died six months after Vincent and is buried next to him in Auvers, France.
8. Theor’s wife collected Vincent’s paintings and letters after his death and dedicated herself to getting his work the recognition it deserved.
Painting:Vincent van GoghFishing in Spring, the Pont de Clichy, 1887, oil on canvas, 50.5 × 60 cm, Art Institute of Chicago. 

Happy birthday, Vincent van Gogh! The genius was born on this day in 1853. Here are a few interesting facts about his life you might already know or could be interested to find out:

1. Van Gogh did not begin painting until his late twenties, completing many of his best-known works during the last two years of his life.

2. Vincent’s earliest career aspiration was to be a pastor in the Dutch Reformed Church like his father.

3. There is some evidence that Van Gogh nibbled at his paints, and the eating of paints is possibly connected with his seizure around New Year 1890. In January 1890, after another one of Vincent’s seizures, Theo wrote to him saying "if you know that it is dangerous for you to have colours near you, why don’t you clear them away for a time, and make drawings?"

4. Van Gogh signed his paintings simply "Vincent", not “Vincent van Gogh” nor “Van Gogh”. In a letter to his brother Theo, written on 24 March 1888, he said that “in the future my name ought to be put in the catalogue as I sign it on the canvas, namely Vincent and not Van Gogh, for the simple reason that they do not know how to pronounce the latter name here.” (“Here” being Arles, in the south of France)
If you’ve wondered how you pronounce Van Gogh, remember it’s a Dutch surname, not French or English. So the “Gogh” is pronounced so it rhymes with the the Scottish “loch”. It’s not “goff” nor “go”. 

5. When van Gogh died, his work was known to only a handful of people and appreciated by fewer still. He only sold one painting during his lifetime.

6. Vincent is believed to have shot himself in a wheatfield in Auvers, France, although no gun was ever found. He did not die until 2 days later at the age of 37. 

7. Vincent’s brother Theo died six months after Vincent and is buried next to him in Auvers, France.

8. Theor’s wife collected Vincent’s paintings and letters after his death and dedicated herself to getting his work the recognition it deserved.

Painting:
Vincent van Gogh
Fishing in Spring, the Pont de Clichy, 1887, oil on canvas, 50.5 × 60 cm, Art Institute of Chicago. 

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Whoever already watched The Grand Budapest Hotel is probably wondering, whether the two central paintings in the film are real artworks. Whoever hasn’t watched the film yet, go watch it first and then come back to this post! The film is great!!

The “priceless” painting Boy with Apple in Wes Anderson’s film is actually a 21st-century, made-for-film creation. It was painted by artist Michael Taylor – so it’s a fiction within a fiction that plays delicately with the art history of old Europe, pretending it is a real Renaissance masterpiece.
The artist Johannes Van Hoytl the Younger, to whom this renowned and unimaginably expensive masterpiece is attributed in the film, has much in common with other masters of the Renaissance in northern Europe. In one of the interviews Wes Anderson said, that the reference was intentionally made to kind of Flemish painters. They were trying to suggest that it wasn’t an Italian Renaissance painting, but a more northern one.

When a film’s character realises the painting is missing, he notices a watercolour of lesbian lovers hanging on the wall instead of it, that instantly brings the Austrian genius Egon Schiele in mind. However, Two Lesbians Masturbating was painted by Rich Pellegrinocommissioned to create this Schiele-type erotic painting by Wes Anderson. 

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir
The Bay of Naples, 1881, oil on canvas, 59.7 x 81.3 cm, the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

The Bay of Naples, 1881, oil on canvas, 59.7 x 81.3 cm, the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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The way we document the surroundings change together with the face of the cities we live in. Halley Docherty has taken 18th and 19th-century well known historical paintings of city scenes around the world and superimposed them on to present-day Google Street View screenshots. Take a look at more collages of cities then and now! 

Photo credits (do not remove if you reblog!) : Halley Docherty.

Via The Guardian

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